India, China expected to hold Corps Commander-level talks on Monday at Moldo on border stand-offIndia, China expected to hold Corps Commander-level talks on Monday at Moldo on border stand-off

The border tussle between the two nuclear-armed neighbors has refused to subside. Could this become a full-blown warlike in 1962, or will it lead it to a short Kargil conflict like situation?

India, China expected to hold Corps Commander-level talks on Monday at Moldo on border stand-offIndia, China expected to hold Corps Commander-level talks on Monday at Moldo on border stand-off

India and China are looking forward to hold a Corps Commander-level talks at Moldo, on the Chinese side of the Line of Actual Control (LAC) on Monday, on the border standoff. This will be the sixth such talks on the issue since the skirmishes started between the South-Asian Giants.

An official from the Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) is likely to be part of the Indian delegation. This is the first time that an MEA official will be present in this meeting, people aware of the developments said.

A high-powered government panel on China had on Friday reviewed the latest developments in the Ladakh sector where the two countries have been engaged in the standoff since May. The agenda of the next round of military talks were discussed in Friday’s which was meeting attended by defense minister Rajnath Singh, national security adviser Ajit Doval, chief of defense staff General Bipin Rawat, army chief General Manoj Mukund Naravane, and other top officials. The meeting took place a day after Singh told Parliament that no force in the world can stop the Indian Army from patrolling borders, signaling a resolve to regain access to several areas that are now difficult to reach due to actions by the Chinese army along the LAC.

In the previous five meetings, the Corps commander-ranked officers have failed to break the deadlock. Monday’s meeting will be their first after the Indian Army swiftly moved and occupied key heights to prevent the People’s Liberation Army from grabbing Indian territory on the southern bank of Pangong Tso in a stealthy midnight move on August 29.

This will be the first meeting since the foreign ministers of the two countries agreed on a five-point roadmap to take forward the disengagement and de-escalation process. The five-point plan was discussed when external affairs minister S Jaishankar and his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi met on the margins of a Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) meet in Moscow earlier this month.

Gen. Bipin Rawat, India’s chief of Defense Staff, warned Pakistan last week not to exploit the crisis with China.

“Pakistan could take advantage of any threat developing along northern borders (from China) and create trouble for us,” Rawat said, warning that Islamabad “may suffer heavy losses should they attempt any misadventure.”

India unilaterally declared Ladakh a federal territory and separated it from Kashmir in August 2019, ending its semi-autonomous status and straining the already prickly relationship between New Delhi and Beijing. China was among the countries to strongly condemn the move, raising it at international forums including the U.N. Security Council.